The Health Risks of Extraterrestrial Environments
Skip Navigation...
  1. Home
  2. THREE Encyclopedia
  3. Bibliography
  4. Archive
  5. Glossary

This site requires the use of
Adobe Acrobat Reader.
If you need to upgrade click the
icon below.

This site requires the use of Adobe Acrobat Reader. 
                    If you need to upgrade click the 
                    icon below.

Current Active Detectors for Dosimetry and Spectrometry on the International Space Station

Cary Zeitlin, Larry Pinsky
5/5/2020

Abstract

We present a high-level overview of two of the most important radiation detection systems currently flying aboard the International Space Station (ISS), ISS-RAD and Timepix. ISS-RAD is a single, large unit that is capable of detecting both charged and neutral high-energy particles. For most of its first three and a half years of operations onboard Station, ISS-RAD has been periodically moved to different modules, including the USLab, Columbus, JEM, Node2, and Node3. In contrast, the much smaller Timepix-based detectors are deployed in several locations around the station. The first generation of these units were known as REMs, or Radiation Environment Monitors. A second generation has recently been deployed, known as REM-2 units. We will briefly describe the technologies used in these systems and their capabilities.

Full Text